Tag Archives: french

My New Year’s Resolutions

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I think this picture kind of sums up 2016. I haven’t spent much time reflecting back, only looking forward. Defining how I will shape 2017 and what I hope to achieve from it. My personal New Year’s Resolutions for 2017 I’m making public here to have a place I can come back to and remind myself of the goals. And you know, if you say it out load you’re more likely to accomplish it.

 

Above self-portrait inspired by Milio BURQUIN’s painting, La buveuse d’absinthe taken in my home in France in Rouje shirt with a traditional French Pastis in hand.

 

  1. Put stronger ideas, meaning and emotion into my photographs.
  2. Take fewer photographs to make more impactful ones.
  3. Study the light of Provence. Break it down into a scientific equation.
  4. Add the passage of time into my photographs through movements like in a symphony.
  5. Shoot more 4×5 film
  6. Make photographs more like paintings.
  7. Get a dog. IT’S TIME.
  8. Build a darkroom.
  9. Move to California.
  10. Work on empathy.
  11. Define the purpose of my photographs.
  12. Define myself and style as a photographer and apply it to everything, not just my personal work.
  13. Make commitments.
  14. Set new professional goals.
  15. Create one photography tutorial a week on social media to share my knowledge and continue to build a community over our shared passion.
  16. Create one film noir short on social media based around a 24 hour story once a week.
  17. Shoot more ballerinas.
  18. Shoot more flowers.
  19. Stop wasting. Wasting food, wasting money, wasting products.
  20. Live with less.
  21. Shoot more for others.
  22. Make a home.
  23. Save money for real vacations, not work vacations.
  24. Finish the new photography portfolio site.
  25. Finish the Cinemagraphs site.
  26. Create Cinemagraphs for art, not commerce.
  27. Do something good for my body’s health everyday through physical activity.
  28. Stop drinking all together.  Drink less 😉
  29. Find a way to create more romanticism in my work.
  30. Build the world I want to live in, not the one others want for me.
  31. Learn to be more comfortable sharing my life.

“If to live is to express the emotions of life, then to create art is to express the life of emotions.” -Edward Weston, Group f.64

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The French Cheese Culture

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France is a culture of cheese, chief amongst the reasons we get along so very well. One of my favorite stops each Saturday at the market is with my local fromager, Clement. His wife’s family raise sheep and have been making cheese for generations. He attends five different markets each week, selling only the finest fromage, has been utterly sweet to me, and is extremely passionate and knowledgeable about his products.

For this particular cheese plate I created on an unexpectedly balmy December afternoon I asked Clement to recommend a variety of cheeses from different regions of France with different textures, colors, and flavor profiles. Some young, some aged, soft, firm, creamy, cow’s milk, goat, sheep.  His suggestions of 5 cheeses (4 of which are available in the US from Murry’s Cheese, my FAVORITE cheese store in New York, and linked below!) led to the most beautifully decedent platter mixed in with a symphony of dried fruits, nuts, olives, tapenades, honey and saussions (cured meats) from the local market.

(more…)

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Chateau Saint-Martin

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Perched high a top a hill, the view from Chateau Saint-Martin swoops down over the ancient town of Vence soaring right out to the French Riviera’s magnificent blue waters that seem to melt into the sky. It’s breathtaking and something this luxury hotel showcases as much as possible from hotel room balconies, to sweeping terraces and large picture windows across the dining room, a perfect place to watch the sunset. Walking the manicured grounds you see traces of the estate’s history beginning in 350 AD to its important role for the Knights Templar in 1150 (who folklore claims buried great treasures among the grounds). 

It is traditional French glamour from the floral bed linens to the oil paintings and master fireplaces. I felt like a princess, just as when I stayed at the Le Bristol in Paris, another property that is part of the Oetker Collection. Aside from waking up to views of the French Riviera, I loved the property’s incredible gastronomy restaurant, Le Saint-Martin. Though wonderfully modern in technique and delightfully surprising, I appreciate that they still finished the meal with an oh-so-French traditional cheese cart, as if you could forget where you are with views like these….

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Above, smelling the roses in Of A Kind shirt dress. Below, Steamline Luggage in Starlet. (more…)

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Coeur a la Creme

~Molly & Jamie At the Green Market~

From Food Stylist Molly:

It wasn’t until I moved to New York that I started drinking milk from local dairies. I was so excited when I found glass bottles of locally produced milk in the regular supermarket. The pretty, retro glass bottles were enough to entice me to buy it, and the milk was so much fresher, creamier and tastier. I couldn’t believe the difference! There are a bunch of small, local dairies that are supplying the city and its farmer’s markets with wonderful milk, cream, yoghurt and other dairy products.

With Valentine’s Day just around the corner, I decided to make a Coeur a la Creme. French in name and origin, Coeur a la Creme is an incredibly simple, yet lovely and refined dessert. You only need a handful of ingredients and can make both the cream hearts and raspberry sauce in advance. Fresh cream and cheese are the stars of this dessert, so the quality and freshness of your dairy ingredients are essential to your success. Happy Valentine’s Day, lovers. And for all you single girls (and guys), go for it! There is no reason why we can’t have our cake and eat it too.

Coeur a la Creme

Special Equipment: Four 4” Coeur a la Creme molds, cheesecloth

• 1/2 cup farmer’s cheese

• 1/2 cup creme fraiche

• 1/4 cup sugar

• 1 teaspoon fresh lemon juice

• 2/3 cup heavy cream, very cold

Line each heart mold with a piece of cheese cloth so that the cloth hangs over the sides of the mold by about 2 inches. Set aside.

In a mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, mix the farmer’s cheese, creme fraiche, sugar and lemon juice until well blended. Remove the paddle and replace with a whisk attachment. Add the heavy cream and whip until you have the texture of whipped cream (this happens quite quickly- don’t over whip!)

Spoon the cream into the lined molds. Fold the cheesecloth over the top so that the entire surface area is covered with cloth. Place the finished molds on a plate and refrigerate overnight.

Raspberry Sauce

• 4 pints raspberries, rinsed and drained

• 1 cup sugar

• 1/2 lemon, juiced

Place half of the raspberries in a bowl and muddle with a fork. In a medium saucepan, combine the muddled raspberries, whole raspberries, sugar and lemon juice. Place over medium low heat and gently simmer until the raspberries have softened and begun to release their juices, about 5 minutes. Cool completely and set aside or refrigerate until ready for use.

To Assemble:

Place a large spoonful of the chilled raspberry sauce on a plate. Take a heart mold and peel the cheesecloth from the top of the cream. Carefully invert the heart onto the center of the plate and gently peel away the cheesecloth. Repeat with the remaining molds and serve immediately.

~ Recipe and words by Food Stylist, Molly Shuster. Photography by me.

An ongoing collaboration, please do see more recipes from our series!



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